New Media Birthday Party Oct 15th 7-9PM

Hello:
It was twenty years ago in the Fall of ’89 when a young analyst joined Alex Brown & Sons with a plan to launch a networking + media investment banking practice.  The plan was based on bringing companies public that helped everyone move to email and network-based services, making universal what only workstation users enjoyed at the time.
The practice was called NEW MEDIA.  One of the results was the IPO of America Online in March, 1992.
It was also in 1989 that Tim Berners-Lee submitted his first proposal at CERN for what became the World Wide Web (http://www.w3.org/History/1989/proposal.html).
Twenty years later, with old-media fighting for financial survival, it’s time to throw NEW MEDIA a birthday party.  While still young, she as grown into a global powerhouse, upsetting regimes and recasting fortunes.
Come join some originals and many of the next wave of NEW MEDIA entrepreneurs at her 20th Birthday Party.  It will be thrown at the loft of that analyst at 36 W. 20th Street, 4th Floor, 7-9PM Thursday Oct 15th.
We expect video guests from SF, LA, Maui, DC, London, Beijing and Berlin to wish her a happy 20th.
Drinks and munchies provided.  Bring your memories and your business plans.  Friends are welcome too!
Mark Stahlman
Signal Lake Ventures

My friend Mark is throwing New Media a birthday party this Thursday to celebrate the radical change that has happened because of her arrival 20 years ago, come join us as we relive the memories and discuss the future. RSVP in the comment section, space is limited so act quickly.

It was twenty years ago in the Fall of ’89 when a young analyst joined Alex Brown & Sons with a plan to launch a networking + media investment banking practice.  The plan was based on bringing companies public that helped everyone move to email and network-based services, making universal what only workstation users enjoyed at the time.

The practice was called NEW MEDIA.  One of the results was the IPO of America Online in March, 1992.

It was also in 1989 that Tim Berners-Lee submitted his first proposal at CERN for what became the World Wide Web.

Twenty years later, with old-media fighting for financial survival, it’s time to throw NEW MEDIA a birthday party.  While still young, she has grown into a global powerhouse, upsetting regimes and recasting fortunes.

Come join some originals and many of the next wave of NEW MEDIA entrepreneurs at her 20th Birthday Party.

It will be thrown at the loft of that analyst at 36 West 20th Street, 4th Floor, 7-9PM Thursday Oct 15th.

We expect video guests from SF, LA, Maui, DC, London, Beijing and Berlin to wish her a happy 20th.

Drinks and munchies provided.  Bring your memories and your business plans.  Friends are welcome too!

Mark Stahlman
Signal Lake Ventures

The Founder Institute

I’m honored to be part of the TheFunded, Founder Institutes first semester. I am one of the mentors to new and old founders that are passionate about building the next startups that will change the world. I will be working with founders on Ideation, Product Planning. We are going to change the world of how startup incubation is done, this is really exciting.

The Founder Institute:

TheFunded Founder Institute is a new founder-centric incubator that trains new and seasoned entrepreneurs alike to lead the next generation of innovative companies. The unique 4-month program offers the industry’s most founder-friendly startup environment, mentorship from renowned CEOs, fundraising opportunities at fair market value, and shared equity upside for all participants. Passionate founders are invited to apply today at www.FounderInstitute.com.

We can use your help to spread the word: mention the Institute on your blog, send out a Twitter message, or contact a journalist.

Why is the Institute special?

— The Institute protects founders from exploitive practices with a founder-centric offering,
— Offers founders upside from pooled equity in participating companies,
— Secures heavily discounted products, tools, and services, and
— Attracts fair market investment from top-rated investors.

don’t forget to follow @founding and myself to keep in touch with what the plans are @bryanthatcher

JS-Kit Revolutionizes Commenting With The Launch of JS-Word

The World’s First One Word Commenting Service
Highlights
  • JS-Kit, finding it incredibly difficult to scale it’s service, innovates around the problem by limiting users to one word.
  • “The reality is that most visitors can’t string two good sentences together never mind two words.  JS-Word solves this problem by focusing users minds on one great word”, Mike Arrington, TechCrunch “We will be rolling this out across the network in the coming days.”
  • JS-Kit’s patent pending “One-Word monetization model” allows verbose users to pay for additional words.  “If you have more to say, you have more to pay.”, Khris Loux, CEO JS-Kit
Full Details
After doing extensive research including focus groups and mail-in surveys over a 42-47 day period, JS-Kit releases JS-Word, a one word commenting platform for publishers.
Pressed for the details of his approach and the extensive use of recent funding, Khris Loux, CEO of JS-Kit, provides the following insight.  “Scalability is often a blanket term applied to too many users.  We think it’s just too many words.”
“After all, Mary Poppins was not a great nanny because of her umbrella.” says Chris Saad, VP of Product and Community Strategy at JS-Kit, “Accordingly we dug deep, we dug real deep. We dug the digging.”
The root source of our scalability issues was the vast number of comments.  We evaluated solutions such as deleting old comments, randomly removing comments or leaving the country.  But at the end of the day we decided that the problem was our users were too chatty.
“I sometimes wonder if our visitors can even read, let alone write.” says Arrington, Editor of TechCrunch.  “So in essence, the root of the problem for us, is having to moderate all this drivel.”

Introducing, JS-Word, visitors no longer have to worry about coherent thoughts or grammar.  Loux continues, “So if visitors can type a single word they can participate.  We are, in essence, democratizing social media to the lowest common denominator.  Groups of like minded users can even collaborate to put a sentence together. The result is users spend much more time on the site and drive more return traffic.”

What industry thought leaders are saying about JS-Word:

“Boom” – Steve Jobbs, Apple

“Change” – Barack Obama, President of the United States of America
“HaHa” Robert Scoble, RackSpace
“BullShit”, Steve Gilmor
“WTF”, Erick Schonfeld


Press release by:

@khrisloux
@globalcitizen
@chrissaad
@bryanthatcher

Google Latitude

I checked out Google Latitude yesterday, pretty cool, kinda a mobile extension of google maps that allows you to see where your friends are and interact with them. When I logged in i already had a request from my friend David Petherick, in the UK, he is contributing editor to the Next Web Blog. I was able to see him take a stroll thru his town today, and had I been in his ‘hood we could of met up for coffee or something.

David wrote a pretty comprehensive analysis on Google Latitude that you should check out, it’s “ten reasons why I think it will succeed

One interesting item I noticed was that Google also has a status update field, hmmm wonder where they are going with that 🙂

  1. 1. It’s Google.
  2. 2. It’s Viral.
  3. 3. Everything is local.
  4. 4. It’s Desktop and Mobile.
  5. 5: I am the most important person in the world. You come second.
  6. 6. Everyone understands Maps.
  7. 7. Uncomplicated sharing.
  8. 8. That’s not Latitude. That’s just an upgrade…
  9. 9. They still don’t get it. But they will.
  10. 10. And What’s next?

More workflow thoughts

While I was putting together my post on how I manage my picture workflow and archiving, it got me thinking about an even larger problem, the archiving and workflow of the production server here at Empressr and Fusebox. This post I’m going to talk about archiving workflow.

At Fusebox we have a climate controlled server room with about 3 racks of assorted machines, these are all used for development and staging of applications and Web sites. We have a couple of co-lo racks in a hosting facility here in the greater NYC area and a redundant facility located in a top secret location somewhere in the middle of the US.

First the production environment, we do incremental backups from our rack to our office thru a VPN tunnel every evening, these backups go to a partition on our development server that has restricted access. This partition is synced to another partition on a different RAID and that is backed up to tape. Then, whatever service that falls into needing redundancy (or disaster recovery) is synced to the respected server at our top secret location, yes somewhere in the midwest.

So then on to our development environment, at a high level, we use a combination of Max OS X. Windows and flavors Unix in this environment, so back up gets tricky. All the front end graphics, images, video gets stored on a Mac Xserver that is hooked to a 16TB RAID 5 storage unit. That gets synced on a nightly basis to a Xserver with a 7 TB RAID. The Unix machines also back up to the 16TB RAID. Then this all gets written to tape as a nightly incremental backup, some of the windows machine get backed up directly, some thru a similar process as the Unix boxes.

I find this to be a tedious and expensive process and really want need to change the way we archive. Tape seems too archaic (and unreliable), backing up to the cloud is to expensive, my only thought right now is to have redundant RAIDs making backups of data.

Any thoughts are greatly appreciated, oh and another drawing, this one is a bit sketchy, as I only spent 5mins doing it,

co-lo

My Picture Managment Workflow

A nightmarish problem that just keeps growing and growing is how to deal with all your personal data when it comes to pictures and video. I’ve been using this work-flow for some years now, I thought I should share it and get some feedback. I do plan on making a few changes to it in the near future.

I shoot mostly still images, in RAW format and then process them into JPGs or PSDs. So the first management issue is, once the images are processed, do I delete the originals, no, I  keep it, the same way that you would save the old film negatives for later reproduction, same apply’s here, you may want to develop that RAW image in a different fashion at a later date. I save developed images in the same directory from that shoot. Speaking of file system, I have recently shifted to dumping the days shoot into a single folder with the date, I sometimes will add additional date to the folder as well.

I organize each daily folder into a monthly folder into a yearly folder. I use Expression Media as my cataloging tool and I catalog based on a years worth of images (I use to have one master of all years, until it corrupted one day and I lost all my meta data 🙁 ).

So the hardware flow is as the following, dump to my Pictures folder, (or lately I carry a portable Seagate 500gb drive that I have been using since I keep filling up my Laptop drive, to a 2TB LaCie RAID that I connect to my laptop one or twice a month (more often if I have some really nice shots that I don’t want to risk). I then sync the 2TB desktop RAID with my 2TB NAS RAID that is in a server rack in a climate controlled environment.

Somewhere along in this process I have processed and uploaded some images to flickr, or maybe facebook, or even here to share, I sometimes send full rez, occasionally If I really like the image I will only upload a medium rez and save the high one for just me, I know selfish…) Then every so often (I should do this more often) I will upload my favorite images RAW and JPG to smugmug for archiving. I currently do not allow browsing of this library, but plan on doing so in the future.

So that’s it, yes I know it sounds like a job, and sometimes it feels like it, but It’s heartbreaking to have a hard-drive failure and lose precious memories, especially since I can’t remember shit these days (gotta work on that next)

Oh and it was fun to actually draw a picture, yeah I have skilz

Why Citysearch should just pull the plug

I was looking for a restaurant to have dinner with my wife this evening. I couldn’t remember the name of the place I wanted to go to, but I knew the street it was on, the cross street, and the type of cuisine. I figured a quick search on Citysearch would find the place, after choosing the neighborhood and the type of restaurant, I started scrolling and scrolling and scrolling. OK, lets try again, I know the street so I should be able to put Bond St, New York, NY and it would return the results of what restaurants were located on and around that street. Error, doesn’t recognize the address, hmmm try again I know a building number that is close by, try that same error, fuck I’ve had enough… gone.

So I try, maps.google.com typed, restaurant bond st nyc

third result was my restaurant, including ratings, reviews and a map.

Done in less than 10 seconds, I spent 10 minutes on Citysearch for zero results (I guess Citysearch made more money in ad dollars than Google did on that search 🙂

Fun thing I found on Cuil.com

This was from a Wired article Jun 29, 2000 about a company I had started called Udefine, it was a really cool idea, still ahead of it’s time it was a “Find Engine”

I love the quote we got!

New site busts out: This year, the number of provocatively dressed booth babes at PC Expo continued to dwindle, as most vendors stressed substance over style. Startup Udefine however, employed a curvaceous woman in a micro skirt and a half T-shirt emblazoned with their booth number to walk the expo floor.

Tamar Stern said she only took on the role of techie temptress to help out a friend who worked at Udefine. Stern, who works as a jewelry designer, said the booth was “never empty” thanks to her strutting.

Her act may have been a little too enticing for one unfortunate gent: As he focused on Stern, someone stole a camera from his cart, which also contained a pet rabbit.